Bright Wall/Dark Room.
6 days ago
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Excerpt from the August issue: Katie Zimolzak on The Godfather (1972)
"Throughout the movie, Michael does what he can to distance himself from his family. His name is the least Italian—the most American—of his siblings. Vito calls Sonny “Santino”; the characters use “Freddy” and “Fredo” in nearly equal measure; Connie hears “Constanza” as a stern warning. While Michael is in Italy, the villagers refer to him by his Italian name—Michele—as does the priest during the Latin portion of the climactic christening. To his family, though, he is always only Michael.
But, much to Michael’s dismay, his blood is more telling than the syllables of his name—it runs red, strong as Sicilian Marsala, even in the veins of a decorated American war hero. He may have brought a beautiful blonde girl in a red and white polka-dotted dress—the very image of American assimilation—to his sister’s wedding, but that doesn’t mean Michael is assimilated.  Everywhere Kay turns, she sees swarthy complexions and dark brown hair. Michael’s brothers, his sister, their spouses, their children. Michael’s family. Michael himself.”
—
This is an excerpt from the current August issue of Bright Wall/Dark Room magazine. To read the rest, purchase a copy of the issue for $2, or subscribe annually for $20. 

Excerpt from the August issue: Katie Zimolzak on The Godfather (1972)

"Throughout the movie, Michael does what he can to distance himself from his family. His name is the least Italian—the most American—of his siblings. Vito calls Sonny “Santino”; the characters use “Freddy” and “Fredo” in nearly equal measure; Connie hears “Constanza” as a stern warning. While Michael is in Italy, the villagers refer to him by his Italian name—Michele—as does the priest during the Latin portion of the climactic christening. To his family, though, he is always only Michael.

But, much to Michael’s dismay, his blood is more telling than the syllables of his name—it runs red, strong as Sicilian Marsala, even in the veins of a decorated American war hero. He may have brought a beautiful blonde girl in a red and white polka-dotted dress—the very image of American assimilation—to his sister’s wedding, but that doesn’t mean Michael is assimilated.  Everywhere Kay turns, she sees swarthy complexions and dark brown hair. Michael’s brothers, his sister, their spouses, their children. Michael’s family. Michael himself.”

This is an excerpt from the current August issue of Bright Wall/Dark Room magazine. To read the rest, purchase a copy of the issue for $2, or subscribe annually for $20. 

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Marlon Brando, on the set of The Godfather, having make-up applied while Francis Ford Coppola looks on.

Marlon Brando, on the set of The Godfather, having make-up applied while Francis Ford Coppola looks on.

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1 week ago
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Sylvester Stallone, on living in an “eight foot apartment”, nearly having to sell his own dog, watching Chuck Wepner fight Muhammed Ali in 1975, and creating Rocky. 

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Bebe Ballroom on Rocky (1976)
"No one ever told me how beautiful Sylvester Stallone was in 1976. Sunken-in eyes, almost able to make out the skull beneath the skin. Big, permanently wounded doll eyes, surprisingly smooth skin, face like a basset hound. How Adrien’s features complemented Rocky’s perfectly—fair skin, black hair, deflated cheeks—as if her skull were the female version of a pair, Adam and Eve in the garden of Eden.
Like Inception’s dream within a dream within a dream, Rocky is an underdog within an underdog within an underdog. Rocky lives in a small rundown apartment, wins or loses fights for small change, and is mostly alone. When he warns a teenage girl about the consequences of hanging out with the “coconuts on the corner,” he does so with a seasoned tongue, like he’s been one of those coconuts. “They don’t remember you,” he tells her, “they remember the rest.” He’s southpaw without a trainer who’s been kicked out of his gym of ten years. In a time when calling someone a bum was an insult that carried significant weight, much of the film is people telling Rocky, directly to his face, that he’s a bum.”
—
This is an excerpt from the current August issue of Bright Wall/Dark Room magazine. To read the rest, purchase a copy of the issue for $2, or subscribe annually for $20. 

Bebe Ballroom on Rocky (1976)

"No one ever told me how beautiful Sylvester Stallone was in 1976. Sunken-in eyes, almost able to make out the skull beneath the skin. Big, permanently wounded doll eyes, surprisingly smooth skin, face like a basset hound. How Adrien’s features complemented Rocky’s perfectly—fair skin, black hair, deflated cheeks—as if her skull were the female version of a pair, Adam and Eve in the garden of Eden.

Like Inception’s dream within a dream within a dream, Rocky is an underdog within an underdog within an underdog. Rocky lives in a small rundown apartment, wins or loses fights for small change, and is mostly alone. When he warns a teenage girl about the consequences of hanging out with the “coconuts on the corner,” he does so with a seasoned tongue, like he’s been one of those coconuts. “They don’t remember you,” he tells her, “they remember the rest.” He’s southpaw without a trainer who’s been kicked out of his gym of ten years. In a time when calling someone a bum was an insult that carried significant weight, much of the film is people telling Rocky, directly to his face, that he’s a bum.”

This is an excerpt from the current August issue of Bright Wall/Dark Room magazine. To read the rest, purchase a copy of the issue for $2, or subscribe annually for $20. 

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1 week ago
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R.I.P. Richard Attenborough

(1923-2014)

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Richard Attenborough with Robert Downey Jr on the set of Chaplin (1992)

Richard Attenborough with Robert Downey Jr on the set of Chaplin (1992)

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Interviewer: You once said that you wanted to write about movies the way that people actually talked about them when leaving the theatre.
Pauline Kael: Yes, the language we really spoke and the language of movies. I didn’t want to write academic English in an attempt to elevate movies, because I think that actually lowers them. It denies them what makes them distinctive.

Interviewer: You once said that you wanted to write about movies the way that people actually talked about them when leaving the theatre.

Pauline Kael: Yes, the language we really spoke and the language of movies. I didn’t want to write academic English in an attempt to elevate movies, because I think that actually lowers them. It denies them what makes them distinctive.

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1 week ago
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1 week ago
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(illustration by Brianna Ashby)

Because of the lovely and overwhelming response this post has received, Brianna has decided to make prints of this illustration available (via Society6).
50% of the proceeds from any prints sold will be donated to St. Jude Children’s Hospital, a charity that Mr. Williams proudly supported. 
For more details, or to purchase a copy of this print, go here.

(illustration by Brianna Ashby)

Because of the lovely and overwhelming response this post has received, Brianna has decided to make prints of this illustration available (via Society6).

50% of the proceeds from any prints sold will be donated to St. Jude Children’s Hospital, a charity that Mr. Williams proudly supported. 

For more details, or to purchase a copy of this print, go here.

Cite Arrow via brightwalldarkroom
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