Bright Wall/Dark Room.
5 days ago
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The original 1944 trailer for The Uninvited.

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Kelsey Ford on The Uninvited (1944):
"Gail Russell, as the waif-like Stella Meredith, is the film’s anomaly. She has a baleful set of eyes you can’t look away from, and although she is widely recognized as a mediocre actress, her performance here is staccato and strange enough to work.
Russell secured a contract with Paramount as a teenager, almost against her will, but she was so clinically shy and uneasy in front of the camera, it was difficult to predict which version of an uneven performance she would give. While filming a later movie, she nervously wrung her hands so often, they had to tie them to her sides with a handkerchief.
“I was possessed with an agonizing kind of self-consciousness,” she said. “I felt my insides tightening into a knot, my face and hands grew clammy, I could not open my mouth. I felt compelled to turn and run if I had to meet new people.”
Russell began drinking on the set of The Uninvited, a habit that haunted her through the rest of her life. There’s a shot of her online, failing an alcohol test from an officer. Her hair is tied back in a bandanna, her lips pursed out of concentration and amusement, her eyebrows lofted. In 1957, in one of many drunk-driving incidents, Russell crashed a car through the windows of a café, pinning a janitor beneath her convertible. She died at the age of thirty-five, her liver damaged from years of abuse. In the last year of her life, she retreated into her home, painting and drinking and occasionally, according to a local radio DJ, calling in to request the song “Stella by Starlight.” The DJ says she called the night before she died; she didn’t want to be identified, she just wanted to hear the song written by a smitten composer for a character she’d played once, before everything else.”

—“These Haunted Shores”, Bright Wall/Dark Room magazine, Oct. 2014

Kelsey Ford on The Uninvited (1944):

"Gail Russell, as the waif-like Stella Meredith, is the film’s anomaly. She has a baleful set of eyes you can’t look away from, and although she is widely recognized as a mediocre actress, her performance here is staccato and strange enough to work.

Russell secured a contract with Paramount as a teenager, almost against her will, but she was so clinically shy and uneasy in front of the camera, it was difficult to predict which version of an uneven performance she would give. While filming a later movie, she nervously wrung her hands so often, they had to tie them to her sides with a handkerchief.

“I was possessed with an agonizing kind of self-consciousness,” she said. “I felt my insides tightening into a knot, my face and hands grew clammy, I could not open my mouth. I felt compelled to turn and run if I had to meet new people.”

Russell began drinking on the set of The Uninvited, a habit that haunted her through the rest of her life. There’s a shot of her online, failing an alcohol test from an officer. Her hair is tied back in a bandanna, her lips pursed out of concentration and amusement, her eyebrows lofted. In 1957, in one of many drunk-driving incidents, Russell crashed a car through the windows of a café, pinning a janitor beneath her convertible.

She died at the age of thirty-five, her liver damaged from years of abuse. In the last year of her life, she retreated into her home, painting and drinking and occasionally, according to a local radio DJ, calling in to request the song “Stella by Starlight.” The DJ says she called the night before she died; she didn’t want to be identified, she just wanted to hear the song written by a smitten composer for a character she’d played once, before everything else.”

—“These Haunted Shores”, Bright Wall/Dark Room magazine, Oct. 2014

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5 days ago
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brightwalldarkroom:

The 2014 Halloween issue of Bright Wall/Dark Room magazine is now available! 
Featuring brand new essays on Return to Oz, Eraserhead, The Hunger, Only Lovers Left Alive, The Uninvited, Heavy Metal, In the Mouth of Madness, and The Monster Squad, each accompanied by original artwork from Brianna Ashby. And, as an extra bonus, we’ve even put together a musical playlist to go with the issue!
Purchase an annual subscription to BW/DR for $20 and get your Halloween on.

brightwalldarkroom:

The 2014 Halloween issue of Bright Wall/Dark Room magazine is now available!

Featuring brand new essays on Return to Oz, Eraserhead, The Hunger, Only Lovers Left Alive, The Uninvited, Heavy Metal, In the Mouth of Madness, and The Monster Squad, each accompanied by original artwork from Brianna Ashby. And, as an extra bonus, we’ve even put together a musical playlist to go with the issue!

Purchase an annual subscription to BW/DR for $20 and get your Halloween on.

Cite Arrow via brightwalldarkroom
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The 2014 Halloween issue of Bright Wall/Dark Room magazine is now available! 
Featuring brand new essays on Return to Oz, Eraserhead, The Hunger, Only Lovers Left Alive, The Uninvited, Heavy Metal, In the Mouth of Madness, and The Monster Squad, each accompanied by original artwork from Brianna Ashby. And, as an extra bonus, we’ve even put together a musical playlist to go with the issue!
Purchase an annual subscription to BW/DR for $20 and get your Halloween on.

The 2014 Halloween issue of Bright Wall/Dark Room magazine is now available!

Featuring brand new essays on Return to Oz, Eraserhead, The Hunger, Only Lovers Left Alive, The Uninvited, Heavy Metal, In the Mouth of Madness, and The Monster Squad, each accompanied by original artwork from Brianna Ashby. And, as an extra bonus, we’ve even put together a musical playlist to go with the issue!

Purchase an annual subscription to BW/DR for $20 and get your Halloween on.

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1 week ago
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Our brand new Halloween issue comes out TOMORROW. 
Featuring essays on The Hunger, Only Lovers Left Alive, Return to Oz, Eraserhead, The Uninvited, Heavy Metal, The Monster Squad, In the Mouth of Madness (by reader request) and more…
Subscribe now and get it the minute it comes out tomorrow morning!

Our brand new Halloween issue comes out TOMORROW. 

Featuring essays on The Hunger, Only Lovers Left Alive, Return to Oz, Eraserhead, The Uninvited, Heavy Metal, The Monster Squad, In the Mouth of Madness (by reader request) and more…

Subscribe now and get it the minute it comes out tomorrow morning!

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1 week ago
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"My Body’s a Zombie for You" - Dead Man’s Bones (Ryan Gosling)

I’ve thought about it for a bit—have actually written and re-written this opening line several times already—and I’m still not sure whether you’re better off knowing anything about this song before you hear it, whether it will add or detract to your experience to know in advance what you are about to hear, or that Ryan Gosling is doing the singing.

There’s also a fair point to be made in saying that a song entitled “My Body’s a Zombie for You” needs no other introduction, really. But then, I’d argue, you wouldn’t realize so many things about it, like how there’s an entire kids choir singing back-up vocals, or how the piano line that runs throughout the song is perfect in its pop simplicity, or how you’ll be running around with the sing-a-long chorus stuck in your head for weeks. 

If you need an excuse to enjoy a song about the undead, tell yourself it’s October, that Halloween is right around the corner, that this is the month for a song like this. If you have no such hang-ups, though, just dive right in. This is one of the best Halloween songs you’ll ever hear. 

Hey girl.

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1 week ago
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There is a kind of counter-criticism that seeks to expand the work of art, by connecting it, opening up its meanings, inviting in the possibilities. A great work of criticism can liberate a work of art, to be seen fully, to remain alive, to engage in a conversation that will not ever end but will instead keep feeding the imagination. Not against interpretation, but against confinement, against the killing of the spirit. Such criticism is itself great art.

This is a kind of criticism that does not pit the critic against the text, does not seek authority. It seeks instead to travel with the work and its ideas, invite it to blossom and invite others into a conversation that might have previously seemed impenetrable, to draw out relationships that might have been unseen and open doors that might have been locked. This is a kind of criticism that respects the essential mystery of a work of art, which is in part its beauty and its pleasure, both of which are irreducible and subjective.

»Rebecca Solnit
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1 week ago
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"What if the things we wished for when we were desperate, vulnerable, and helpless—that we’d be avenged somehow, or that those who caused us suffering would suffer even worse—could happen? Willed into being by our thoughts? Mean girls find safety and power in numbers; there is a bond in a clique, and those groups make their own rules. They can cause change, they can alter the course of someone’s life, they can wreak havoc on another person’s psychology; however, they fail when their target is desperate, with nothing left to lose. This is true horror: alienating someone until they are somewhere between human and animal, fighting to survive, un-buffered by the comforts of others.”
—Tess Lynch on Carrie, from last year’s Halloween issue
(illustration by Brianna Ashby)


"What if the things we wished for when we were desperate, vulnerable, and helpless—that we’d be avenged somehow, or that those who caused us suffering would suffer even worse—could happen? Willed into being by our thoughts? Mean girls find safety and power in numbers; there is a bond in a clique, and those groups make their own rules. They can cause change, they can alter the course of someone’s life, they can wreak havoc on another person’s psychology; however, they fail when their target is desperate, with nothing left to lose. This is true horror: alienating someone until they are somewhere between human and animal, fighting to survive, un-buffered by the comforts of others.”

—Tess Lynch on Carrie, from last year’s Halloween issue

(illustration by Brianna Ashby)

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My heroes are no more neurotic than the audience. Unless you can feel that a hero is just as fucked up as you are, and that you would make the same mistakes that he would make, you can have no satisfaction when he does commit a heroic act. »

Nicholas Ray

(via tehswamphag)

Cite Arrow via tehswamphag
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1 week ago
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OPEN CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS:Do you want to write for Bright Wall/Dark Room magazine?We are now officially accepting pitches and submissions for consideration in our November issue.  The theme for the issue will be “film noir” - however you wish to define that - and while any pitches on this theme will be fully considered, we’re especially interested in pitches on the following films:
Double Indemnity 
Out of the Past
The Big Sleep
Mulholland Drive
The Long Goodbye (1973 version)
The Big Lebowski
The Maltese Falcon
Seven
Heat
Detour
The Lady from Shanghai 
The Killers
True Romance
Kiss Me Deadly
Sweet Smell of Success
Touch of Evil
Dark City
Blade Runner
L.A. Confidential
Memento
So, If you have an idea (or an essay) that you think might work, contact us via email (bwdr.editors@gmail.com), or pitch something through our Submittable page by October 13th.
If it’s something we can use, we’ll be in touch in the very near future — and you could see your piece published in our upcoming November (Noir-vember?) issue!

OPEN CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS:

Do you want to write for Bright Wall/Dark Room magazine?

We are now officially accepting pitches and submissions for consideration in our November issue.  The theme for the issue will be “film noir” - however you wish to define that - and while any pitches on this theme will be fully considered, we’re especially interested in pitches on the following films:

Double Indemnity 
Out of the Past
The Big Sleep
Mulholland Drive
The Long Goodbye (1973 version)
The Big Lebowski
The Maltese Falcon
Seven
Heat
Detour
The Lady from Shanghai 
The Killers
True Romance
Kiss Me Deadly
Sweet Smell of Success
Touch of Evil
Dark City
Blade Runner
L.A. Confidential
Memento

So, If you have an idea (or an essay) that you think might work, contact us via email (bwdr.editors@gmail.com), or pitch something through our Submittable page by October 13th.

If it’s something we can use, we’ll be in touch in the very near future — and you could see your piece published in our upcoming November (Noir-vember?) issue!

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